Tobdjian family

Avedis Tobdjian was born in Ayntab (Ottoman Empire) in 1909. After WWI and due to the hostility against the Armenian population Avedis's family left Ayntab. In the early 1920s, together with his brother and his mother, Avedis  settled in Aleppo, which at that time was part of Syria under the French mandate. Later, in the mid or late 1920s, he and his family migrated to Argentina. They arrived in 1926 and settled in Cordoba.


Elena Tobdjian's graduation

Graduation photograph, 
Elena Tobdjian (second from right)

Year: 1960

Colección: Tobdjian

Estudio: unknown

Graduation photograph, 
Elena Tobdjian (second from right)

Year: 1960

Colección: Tobdjian

Estudio: unknown

Graduation photograph, 
Elena Tobdjian (second from right)

Year: 1960

Colección: Tobdjian

Estudio: unknown



Tatoul altunian music group

The newcomers organized their cultural life around different institutions. The Tobdjians were at the heart of the Armenian cultural life in the Córdoba of those times. They gathered family and friends to sing together, they also played vocational theater, performing several pieces from different Armenian and non-Armenian writers. Avedis's house in Buenos Aires never stopped being a place of meetings for the Armenian community. His wife Aracsi, who was a piano teacher, would play every evening and Avedis would sing arias and pieces from different composers. The younger generation used to come to their house to share convivial moments. One day a group of young people came and asked Avedis to form a music ensemble. He, who was a fervent music lover, accepted and for the next years the Tobdjian house in Triunvirato became a vivid center for Armenian traditional music - a rehearsal and exchange place.
Tatoul Altounian was an Armenian born in Adana, who later became the founder of the Armenian song-dance state ensemble in Soviet Armenia. The ensemble, named after Tatoul Altounian, was founded and directed by Avedis Tobdjian. He used to play several instruments, but in the ensemble he played the kanun (oriental zither). He had been taught to play this instrument in Argentina by another survivor, Mr Sahag, who was a master instrumentalist in the Ottoman era.

From the left with the violin is Martin Barsamian, sitting with the kanun is Avedis Tobdjian, at the violin is Kevork Kioledjian, at the micro is Carlos Kechichian, at the banjo is Nubar Barsamian, the first accordion is Carlos Kaplanian, and the second accordion is Adolfo Djeordjian.